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IMD Presidents

  • IMD Presidents

  • IMD Presidents

IMD Presidents

IMD Presidents

Period President name Country
1957-1966 Harold B. Maynard USA
1966-1972 Holger Bohlin Sweden
1972-1984 Peter M. Burman UK
1984-1995 Wilfred Helms Germany
1996-2002 Dirk Rouglas USA
2002-2005 Klaus Helmrich Sweden
2005-2016 Hans Fischer Germany

 

The best description of the founding of the MTM Associations and of the IMD was given by the first IMD president, Dr. Harold B. Maynard, in the keynote address of the First Annual MTM Conference at New York City, in October 1952, as follows: “Experience has shown that when an MTM practitioner gains confidence in his ability to apply the procedure, he very often develops the urge to improve upon it. When he encounters unusual motion sequence for the first time, he is quite likely to want to invent one or more new motion classifications and assign tentative time standards to them. If he then checks with a stop watch and finds that they seem to work out all right – which they often do if they are a very small part of the total cycle time – he concludes that he has added to the development of the MTM procedure, and he uses his new motion classifications thereafter without further checking.

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This is, of course, a highly unscientific way of developing the MTM procedure. Unless some kind of control is introduced, it can only result in producing as many different varieties of MTM as there are practicing engineers. Furthermore in most cases, the addition of new motion classifications is completely unnecessary. Experience has already shown that the solution to most application problems lies in learning how to apply existing motion classifications and standards properly, rather than inventing something new. The matter of control is not difficult to handle, however, once the need for it is recognized. In our own organization in the early days of MTM, we discovered quite unexpectedly one day during a discussion of the application problems which our staff had encountered, that each man had added new motion classifications (all different) until we were well on our way to having a completely unstandardized procedure. Obviously this would never do. We, therefore, developed carefully written descriptions of standard motion-classification interpretations and application practices, and we insisted that they be followed to the letter. We admitted that every word in these descriptions might not be correct at first, and we encouraged our engineers to challenge anything which they believed to be wrong. But each point challenged was checked by further research. If it was found to be wrong it was changed, but not until then was the engineer allowed to deviate from the former practice. When a new standard practice was approved, all engineers were immediately required to adopt it. Under this kind of self-imposed discipline, we quickly corrected any initial errors in our application practices and achieved consistency among our own staff. But while this solved our own problem, it did not solve the problems which were rapidly being generated by a growing number of practitioners who were not under our control. We wanted the procedure to be used, for we had a belief in the important contribution which it could make to industry, but we did not want it abused. Too many variations could cause inconsistencies, arguments, weakened faith in the procedure, and all manner of unpleasant consequences. What to do? The problem was discusses in January of 1951 by a small group of management consultants who were either using MTM professionally at that time or were planning to use it. They recognized the need of bringing both the development and the application of the MTM procedure under control and considered various means of accomplishing this. The result of these discussions was the formation of the MTM Association for Standard and Research whose First Annual Conference we are attending today 

ARTICLES IMD


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